In a bid to bridge the gender gap in the technology arena, the #WomenInTech campaign has gained momentum during the stay-at-home e-learning environments.

The campaign has been boosted by more access to the Girls4Tech project by global payments company Mastercard, which aims to equip young women with requisite skills in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM).

A suite of new creative e-learning resources has been designed to help parents and teachers engage and inspire girls aged between 8 and 12.

Through the newly launched website Girls4Tech Connect, teachers and parents from any corner of the globe can download lessons to help students learn about STEM topics, from the comfort of their homes.

“We know that these are challenging times for parents and teachers on many fronts and hope that these learning resources are a fun way to engage and inspire kids about STEM while at home,” Ifeoma Dozie, Director, Marketing and Communications, Mastercard Sub-Saharan Africa said.

These activities are built on global science and maths standards to enable children discover a range of STEM careers, such as fraud detection, data science and software engineering.

“The easy access to the website enhances what we’ve done in our many workshops across Kenya. We look forward to building on both efforts when it’s once again safe to gather in person,” she said.

Now in its sixth year, Girls4Tech has engaged more than 800,000 girls across the globe – including 200 in Kenya – through inquiry-based activities and real-world challenges, all with the goal of inspiring more girls to pursue STEM careers and reduce the gender gap in these fields.

Last month, Mastercard hosted its first 2020 Girls4Tech programme in Kenya where it reached 68 girls aged between 9 and 11.

New activities will be posted on a weekly basis at the Girls4Tech website, Facebook page and Twitter handle.

Lessons are currently available in English and are designed for students to work independently, materials are also available for teachers to guide online sessions.

Girls4Tech programs also extend to girls aged 13 to 16 which incorporates a 20-week coding training.​


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